A last minute decision…

After boarding the ferry I got chatting with a local Alaskan crew member who began talking about a super remote and tiny town with what he claimed were the best waves in Alaska.  I had heard of the little village with a population of less than 300, not connected by road to anywhere, nestled on a peninsula in South East Alaska - open to the full brunt of oceanic swells.  In the week prior i'd even rung up the ferry office to try and change my ticket so I could get off there.  But it was to no avail - "Sorry, if you've got a vehicle, you can't change your ticket, we're booked out for months in advance and if you get off you won't be able to get back on". I decided to give it one last try, and with 10 minutes before the ferry departed I made a frantic dash to see the ferry office people in person and plead my case.  The lady was awesome, and said that 'considering your vehicle is a motorbike, we should be able to squeeze you back on'.  Stoked!   "But there wont be another ferry through there for 2 weeks." No worries at all...   IMG_3343 IMG_2485 So off the ferry I jumped into a day of cold rain with no idea of where to stay in such a tiny town.  Did speak with a local surfer who recommended the open beaches.  They were miles from the town, and backed by a forest with a very healthy Brown Bear population.  Must admit, camping there was at times a little disconcerting, I was the only one out there, had the entire beach and forest to myself every day for 10 days.  But each night the critters would begin their cacophony of noises, I woke with a start and grabbed the bear spray on more than one occasion.  Saw a Brown Bear sow and her cubs on one occasion, only about 5 metres away, made a bit of noise and they bailed thankfully.  Other mornings I woke up with huge piles of bear scat right out the front of the tent - reasonably reassuring in the sense that there was obviously a big bear right next to me as I slept and it didn't want to eat me, although also a stark reminder that i'm definitely not at the top of food chain out here alone. But it was all worth it in the end, plenty of surfing, hiking, fishing, cultural insight, and a good way to start learning how to live out of the motorbike... it's definitely taking some getting used to - a lot harder and time consuming than what I anticipated, but so rewarding.. IMG_4454 IMG_4423 IMG_4415 IMG_4374 IMG_4368 IMG_4181 IMG_4170 IMG_4162 IMG_4035 IMG_4016 IMG_2742 IMG_2682 IMG_2658 IMG_2546 IMG_2573 IMG_1826 IMG_1807 IMG_1717 IMG_1687 IMG_1660-EditIMG_2066 IMG_1527 IMG_1513Overall staying in that little town was amazing, met some great people such as Zoe and Gleb (above).  Zoe is a Cherokee/Tlingit/Norwegian photographer working on a photographic series of Native American culture, and Gleb is a Russian/New Yorker aspiring towards a bright future in wildlife filmmaking.  Many great laughs were shared, with escapades into the night, treks into the mountains and surfs into sea lion territory.  Was always a pleasure to have these guys visit the campsite..

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